Books, eMedia & More Blog

As someone who came of age in the mid-1980s, I was all too familiar with Andrew McCarthy, the actor. He starred in such movies as "St. Elmo's Fire," "Pretty in Pink," and "...

Read St. Louis

St. Louisans love to read. The city was recently ranked the ninth most literate city in the U.S. So it's no surprise that Read St. Louis, the community wide reading intiative, is back for 2013. The program was developed by St. Louis County Library, St. Louis Public Library, and St. Charles City-County Library to encourage St. Louisans to read and discuss great books. 

Each year, Read St. Louis showcases books selected by the libraries...

"Ever After" by Kim Harrison

"Ever After" is Kim Harrison's newest entry in the Hollows/Rachel Morgan series. It is her most ambitious book to date. It opens with a psychotic demon trying to have Rachel killed by the demonic collective because their home, the ever after, is shrinking. The demons blame Rachel for the problem, and she struggles with her confidence and growing powers.

I don't want to give away too many details of the plot. It's convoluted to say the least....

"A Working Theory of Love" by Scott Hutchins

Neill is a divorced, mid-30s guy living in San Francisco and stumbling though life. He works for a start-up company that is attempting to create the first truly intelligent computer. The computer is modeled on his father, who committed suicide in 1996 and left more than 20 years of journals. Using these journals as a starting point, Neill and his partners begin to develop a computer that has a back story and can, hopefully, look forward.

"...

"Ragtime" by E.L. Doctorow

Seeing Elizabeth McGovern on "Downton Abbey" lately reminded me of how good an actor she is. I remember seeing her in the movie,...

Given the success of Steven Spielberg's "Lincoln" and Jennifer Chiaverini's new novel "Mrs. Lincoln's Dressmaker," some may be eager to learn more about Elizabeth Keckley (1819-1907), the actual woman who purchased her freedom from slavery, worked as a seamstress in Washington D.C., and became a friend to Mary Todd Lincoln.

Elizabeth Keckley published her memoir "...

101 Recipes You Can't Live Without by Lori Powell

"101 Recipes You Can't Live Without" offers a wonderful opportunity to begin the year making conscious and healthy food choices. What is great in this cookbook is how it identifies nutrients that will have the most health-promoting potential.

The easy-to-use index allows the reader to search recipes by ingredient. Don't worry that the recipes call for freaky, odd-ball...

"The Girl Who Chased the Moon" by by Sarah Addison Allen

My book discussion group just finished a delightful book by Sarah Addison Allen entitled "The Girl Who Chased the Moon: a Novel." If you're looking for a gentle read, I would recommend it. The book is probably best described as an adult fairy tale.

The book opens with 17-year-old Emily Benedict arriving in Mullaby, North Carolina after the death of her mother. Emily hopes to find answers...

From Sumerian times to Rome to the present day, "Drink: A Cultural History of Alcohol" by Ian Gately discusses the development of alcohol and its cultural treatments by civilizations through the centuries. The book tells the story of the explosion of new types of alcohol, in addition to beer and wine, beginning in the 1700s, and how some popular liquors were either discovered by accident or by techniques used to preserve other...

"Tenth of December" by George Saunders

It seems that everyone is talking about George Saunders and his latest story collection "Tenth of December." A writer for the New York Times Magazine labels it "the best book you'll read this year." That's a bold claim in January when a whole year of books lies ahead. How can you pick the best book of any given year? I might have a most-loved book, or one that taught me the most, a most imaginative, or the most promising new author. So who knows...

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