Anniversary of Disaster

Titanic, First Accounts

 

The 100th anniversary of the Titanic's sinking rekindled my captivation with the tragedy. I watched a lot of the TV specials, and read one book: "Titanic, First Accounts" edited with an introduction by Tim Maltin. The book brings together the recollections of those who survived the sinking of the Titanic. The material has been excerpted from previous works including newspaper articles, books, interviews, and testimony from the official inquiries made by the U.S. Senate and the British government. A significant portion of the book was written by Archibald Gracie, whose writing style is very readable. His experience was harrowing, to say the least and well worth the read.

Step Into New Worlds

Adult Reading Club

 

Summer reading clubs aren't just for kids! The library offers an Adult Reading Club too, which means the whole family can read together this summer.

The Adult Reading Club kicks-off on May 29 with an outer space theme: "Step Into New Worlds." Reading logs with lots of great sci-fi reading suggestions will be given to participants at sign-up. Individuals who complete the club will be entered into a drawing to win gift cards from Nordstrom, Barnes & Noble, Starbucks and the St. Louis Bread Company. Other prizes include Mary Engelbreit tote bags, signed first editions of popular books, and tickets from the St. Louis Cardinals and Wehrenberg Theaters.  

Registration begins May 29. Stop by your local branch to sign-up, then pick up a reading log at and get started!

--Jennifer M., Headquarters

Get Your Poetry On!

Teens at the Jamestown Bluffs branch created poetry for National Poetry Month in April. At a "poetry station" they shared their words, rhymes and thoughts. Here are some of the fabulous words they left behind:

Come darkness, Come light
Thou both mark day and night, life and death
Here and now.
______

Life may only seem and
Look as a dream. But you
Have the faith to know
It's all real. Go for any and
Everything in life!
______   

We laugh.
We cry
We live,
We die.
Some things
Are just meant
To be.
Happiness is
Never too far
Away.
_______

Of all things to love
I Love myself first
For it is within this
Framework that I
Can Truly Love others
The BEST.

 

---Anna H., Jamestown Bluffs

 

Remembering MCA (Adam Yauch)

Remembering MCA (Adam Yauch)

 

I would be remiss in not mentioning the passing of Adam Yauch of the Beastie Boys who died on May 4 of throat cancer at the age of 47. The Beast Boys were a band I knew since the release of "License to Ill" in 1987, but I wasn't into rap, so I discounted the value of the music they made.  It wasn't until the mid-1990s that I actually started listening to their music and I quickly regretted not taking them seriously from the beginning. I guess it was easy to dismiss them since their first hit was titled "(You Gotta) Fight for Your Right (to Party!)" They struck me as college goofs who had nothing of value to say.

Old School Soul

How Do You Do by Mayer Hawthorne

 

Mayer Hawthorne, a 33-year-old singer from Ann Arbor, MI, started off as a rapper and was toying with the Motown Sound when a  record producer heard him and immediately signed him to a contract. Hawthorne has released two albums, "A Strange Arrangement" in 2009 and "How Do You Do" in 2011 and has received critical acclaim for both. While he is not garnering much air play on corporate radio stations, college and independent radio have been highlighting him since the release of "A Strange Arrangement."  

Stories on Playaway

Wild Child by TC Boyle

 

I picked up Wild Child and other stories by T. Coraghessan Boyle from the Playaway display, not even noticing that it was a collection of short stories. I just saw the author's name and figured it would be worth listening to. It was.

The Playaway device is easy to use, although the on/off button for this one was a bit temperamental. Unlike my own MP3 player, it did not have a hair trigger, which is good. Somewhere between sluggish and hair is what you want in a trigger and an on/off button.

I Always Wanted to Go Outside Over There

Outside Over There by Maurice Sendak

 

Growing up in the rural Midwest, my family had to pay the yearly membership fee to use the local library and man, did we all get our money's worth!  While I found our library to be a great place to find books and movies, my ravenous appetite for books had not yet been developed. That all changed when I randomly added "Outside Over There" by Maurice Sendak to my basket.

Minds of Darkness

Wild Nights by Joyce Carol Oates

 

When you encounter the obsessions of an aged, fictional Mark Twain, you realize you've entered the unsettling twilight zone of Joyce Carol Oates. Frightening danger lurks throughout her novel, "Wild Nights," subtitled as "stories about the last days of Poe, Dickinson, Twain, James and Hemingway."

However, she isn't recreating the last days of their historic lives; instead, she's imagining a warmth of imagination that lingers after the flame has gone out. She well knows that writers live in the worlds they can imagine. For example, Poe's imagination outlasts the tumble that ended his historic life in Baltimore and puts him as a solitary lighthouse keeper in the South Pacific.

Dickinson appears in the time of malls and the Internet as the prized robotic possession of a childless couple. As a mechanical projection of the historic Emily Dickinson, she is chiefly a figment of her owners. Yet, like her quaint clothing, she wears vestiges of the inner poet's imagination.

Water, Water, Everywhere

The Lifeboat by Charlotte Rogan

Charlotte Rogan's debut novel "The Lifeboat" is a good bet for readers who enjoy psychological drama. As the book opens Grace Winter is on trial for murder. Readers learn how she arrived in this situation from her recollections and her trial.

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